Early Walk

It was nice to get out early and check out the town.  We climbed up the stairs to the walkway along the river.  First, we went to the left and came to a dead end and then walked back past the boat. Here are a few photos of what we saw:

IMG_9690
A house at the end of the path
IMG_9739
Bauhinia variegata kanchan leaves and flower – one of the bushes I came upon
IMG_9698
Flowers of the above plant
IMG_9700
Boats  docked at the shore
IMG_9707
Birds on the boat
IMG_9716
Entrance to the fort – we didn’t go in as we were going with the group later.
IMG_9771
Close up of the yellow flowers
IMG_9720
Primary school across the street – two cows grazing in the yard.
IMG_9721
Coming down the street – waterman, and a lady carrying goods on her head
IMG_9691
Little boys – not sure about having their photo taken
IMG_9694
This little boy was playing the dirt nearby.  He came over to get his picture taken.

We continued walking down a side street but some dog came running out to bark at us so we didn’t stop to take any photos.  We returned to the boat to wait for the group to meet us and then walked to the fort.

Back With the Group and a Walk to the Minhla Fort

IMG_9732
Cute little girl hanging out at the pier
IMG_9762
Inside the Minhla Fort – originally dated from the 13th century.  It was enlarged and strengthened by Italian engineers
IMG_9769
Our guide, Thu Thu
IMG_9760
Thu Thu was my model

The construction of the fort was unusual.  We climbed the stairs to the top and looked out over the river. Thu Thu mentioned that they use to have the evening meal in the fort but it was taken over by the Archeological Institute and they are not allowed to eat there anymore.

Meandering Around the Streets

After walking around the fort, we meandered down the street.  We had another look at the school and the grazing cows.  The company director was walking along with us.  I mentioned that Shawn and I might be interested in going to Africa.  His company had campsites in various places in Africa but it was not his side of the business.  Since he was from South Africa and had visited some of the campsites, he said he would meet with us and give us his travel thoughts as to which campsite we might like.  We did meet with him the next day and it was a very informative session.  Not sure if we will go, but he gave us some good ideas.

IMG_9799
Believe it or not – this is the fire-fighting equipment – ladder for climbing and a hook to grab things from a burning building
IMG_9801
Local snack store
IMG_9804
More urns and pots
IMG_9795
This is the mean dog who came out to bark at us earlier.  The owner held on to him when she saw our group coming.
IMG_9814
Handmade drums

We met a family who made drums.  They were having to move their house because of the rainy season as it was too close to the edge of the river so they only had these samples of drums to show us.

IMG_9828
Friendly lady who enjoyed seeing her photo
IMG_9830
Many of the houses had a picture of a tiger – they are believed to scare away the evil spirits and are considered house guardians.
IMG_9798
Little boy with his sunburn paste on his face
IMG_9805
The kids look like little ghosts walking around
IMG_9832
Purple flowers
IMG_9840
Fashionable Minhla ladies
IMG_9744
Pretty lady with her basket
IMG_9696
Waving goodbye!

We got back on the boat and left around 10 am heading for Magwe and an afternoon excursion to visit the Mya Than Lun – Pagoda made from gold bricks.

 

 

 

 

2 thoughts

  1. Very nice pictures. If you didn’t know you were in Myanmar some of those children would look right at home here in the south with their sun dresses and fliip flops. The flowers are lovely too. Just wonder about their names. Thanks Dianne for showing us this piece of the world. Love Judy

    Like

Leave a Comment!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.